Saturday, April 9, 2011

Hot Pack

 A hot pack made with Lilly's Sugar n' Cream cotton yarn, size g crochet hook, half double crochet, rice, and a knee high nylon.
 
Note: ch2 at beg of row counts as first hdc of row.
To begin: Chain 18, hdc in 3rd chain from hook, hdc across, (17)
  Row 2 and on:  Ch 2, turn , hdc across. (17)
  Put Together: Once it is exactly twice as long as it's desired length (an even number of rows), without finishing off, fold in half with wrong sides together, ch1, and begin stitching both sides together with single crochet. (Be sure to sc the folded edge as well, to ensure continuity of style.) To turn corners, Sc 3 in each corner stitch. Before stitching all the way around, place Rice Pack inside, and continue to sc around remaining edges. Join w/ slip stitch to top of 1st sc.
For Border: ch1, sc in same sp, ch2, sc in next sp, *(sc in next sp, ch2, sc in next sp) from* around, working one (sc, ch2, sc) in the middle corner stitch for each corner.
Rice Pack: For the inside, fill a knee high nylon with rice, knot it, turn it inside out, and pull the rice bag through the nylon a second time. Sew the nylon opening shut, and place it inside the outer covering. 
To heat: Place in microwave for about 1 to 1 1/2 minutes on high to enjoy a comfy, soothing, long, moist heat. Ahhh!!!! :)

96 comments:

Cakefortwo said...

This is exactly what i've been looking for! I have ZERO sewing skills to actually sew one, and i'd been trying to find a way to crochet one for AGES. i never thought of using the nylon stockings! Thank you SO much!! <3

gratefullyinhisgrace said...

Your welcome! The quicker, the better for me-the nylon stockings work perfectly. Enjoy!

Barbara Bouchard said...

I was so excited when I saw this pattern. I made one and when I put it in the microwave for 1 1/2 minutes, the rice cooked through the nylon and burned the outer cover.

What did I do wrong? I really would like to make several of these.

Barbara Bouchard said...

I was wondering if maybe I stuffed the stocking too much.

Creative Creations by Vicki said...

Oh no, Barbara. :( I'm sorry that happened. One of them that I made, that happened, too, but I had used it quite a bit, and I thought maybe I just heated it too much that one time or it had seen it's day. Other ones I've used/made, that didn't happen to. And I've had many visits to this site with no one else saying this has happened to them, so I was thinking it was perhaps an isolated incident. Perhaps using a small, thin nylon or cotton sock or ped would work better??? -Thin enough to not create too much bulk & not limit the warmth from the rice, but just thick enough to hold together better. If you try a nylon sock, first put the rice in it, use it a few times, and see if it burns through.And PLEASE share your findings with me. I will look into this more, too, when I have the opportunity. You see, I used to just use a big old tube sock and stuff it with rice, (I had a pinched nerve in my neck for 2 years and this was SOO soothing to it), but I got to thinking a pretty little crocheted piece with little or no need to sew would be much nicer looking and make a nice little gift or personal sized rice bag.

Shawn said...

Vicki, just a quick comment in response to the problem Barbara brought up. I make comfort packs with whole feed corn (not cracked corn or pop corn). I read this is better for microwave heat packs, because the kernels are bigger and hold heat better. Also, anything synthetic may melt when it gets too hot. A cotton baby sock or the like would be better. Just my two cents based on experience. I hope this is helpful. Thanks for the super cute pattern!
Shawn

Creative Creations by Vicki said...

Shawn, thank you for your two cents worth! I'm wondering if perhaps this whole feed corn would be large enough to hold in this little bag WITHOUT the nylon. (Just a thought) Forgive the ignorance here, but....where would I get this whole feed corn?
Also, if the whole feed corn holds heat better, then this would be amazing, really, because I have found rice to hold the heat wonderfully, so the corn would be just a bigger bonus. :)
Please let me know where I can get this, so I can try it, and possibly alter this pattern.
Thanks so much!

Barbara Bouchard said...

I am going to try another one. I think that maybe I over stuffed the stocking.

My cousin has been making the heat pads with the feed corn for years. She uses a fleece material and sews them. I know that she has sold many at craft fairs over the last ten years.

mamaquad@live.com said...

I read another pattern that uses flax seed and a touch of lavender oil. She said that the flax seed you can put in both the microwave and freezer, and when heated it will not smell like rice. I have just made one of each rice and seeds. I will test to see which works better. And please, where can one get whole feed corn?!

Anonymous said...

try a feed mill

cyndi said...

Where can we get the lavender oil?

mamaquad@live.com said...

I buy it at WalMart or Michaels. In Michael's it is in the candle making section.

Kathy's Scraps said...

Do not use minute rice, use whole grain rice or brown rice (the stuff you have to cook for 20 minutes or longer). I have a rice filled bag we have used for years...and yes it does smell some. I would love to try the flax seed, will have to look for it. We had one with the corn too, but because the corn is larger it is not as comfortable. And...one of ours got those bugs in them and they were all over. It was awful. The kind of bugs that get in noodles. I will not use corn again.

patty2 said...

I'm going to start making one of these tonight. My daughter makes neck warmer tubes using cherry pits. She gets them up in Traverse City from some of the cherry growers there.

Eutawgrandma said...

I get 50 pound bags of feed corn at my local Ace Hardware store f or about $9.00.

Creative Creations by Vicki said...

Thank you so much for letting us know where you get your feed corn. :)

Auntiereet said...

If you put your grain of choice into the freezer over night that will kill any bugs, eggs etc.. We do that with our bulk bird seed to kill moths. Thanks for the pattern!

Ruth said...

how much rice do you use?

ruth said...

oh another question..on the border then there's two sc's together?

Creative Creations by Vicki said...

Just eye ball it-just enough to happily fill it, but not over-stuff it as to be a rock hard.

Faye said...

I am making 1 of these as I have a chronic pain condition & ALWAYS need a heat pack. However, if I chain 18 then hdc from the 3rd chain across, I get 16, not 15 :)

JohnnieSue said...

These are awesome! Instead of the nylon stocking, I used an old men's white hankerchief, (a bandana would work too). I cut them in half, sewed it into a bag,just like you would for a regular rice bag. Since the hankies/bandannas were different sizes, I crocheted the bags to fit the rice bag. I had some Aunt Lydia's cotton yarn in my stash and it worked as well. Also made some with regular Red Heart worsted yarn and they work fine too. Good way to recyle the bandannas and use up scrap yard.

Barbara Bouchard said...

If you are making these bigger than the pattern, keep in mind that you need to make "sections" so that the rice doesn't always fall to the end hanging down while using it

My second one, I used a sock instead, started to burn after a few uses. I am wondering if my microwave is just getting it hotter than it should.

Anonymous said...

I have been told by a Walmart fabric associate that whenever you make these bags you should only use 100% cotton material because with synthetic material you run the risk of starting a fire in your microwave.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for your pretty idea for a heating pad. I make them using cracked corn (I buy a 25 lb. bag at the local feed store...and I microwave the amount I use for a pad for 3 min. prior to using it as filling..to kill anything in it) Also, baby flannel works wonderfully as a sack to hold the cracked corn...cotton. But, your crocheted cover is so pretty,,,I will be making some! Thank you.
Leslie

Barbara Bouchard said...

Thank you for the advise of using only 100% cotton fabric. I will be trying that next.

Kathy6395 said...

I'm not sure I quite understand the Rice Pack directions. Is the nylon sock only filled half way so you can fold the top part of the sock over - giving you a double layer of nylon?

Anonymous said...

Just tried to print the pattern and it has bad copy Why?

Barbara Bouchard said...

I believe my problem was being caused by the fact that I have a full size microwave. I am going to try reducing the power when I put it in to heat and see if that changes anything.

Charming1 said...

These would also be great to heat up and put in your coat pockets to keep your hands warm on a cold winter's day.

Barbara Bouchard said...

I wanted to post and say that I think mine were burning because I have a 1250 Watt microwave. I have tried reducing the power to 70% and it is working fine.

Anonymous said...

Use all cotton for your inside sack AND all cotton thread to sew it. Otherwise you risk melting. Forhigher power microwaves, use less heating time. Experiment...start with 30-45 seconds and increase the amt next time you use it if it wasn't enough the first time.

Barbara Bouchard said...

Thank you for your suggestions. Will definitely try. I reduced the power on my microwave

Anonymous said...

This is slightly off the subject, but since it was brought up, for those of you that are considering heating anything made with fleece, please think again. It is made from recycled plastic and will melt. If you want to use fleece or even non cotton yarn, make an inner bag from muslin that you heat and then slip into the outer cover.

dalice54 said...

very good point about the fleece..............

Barbara Bouchard said...

My cousin has been making and selling hot packs for years. She uses polar fleece and fills them with inert corn. Never once has any of her hot packs burned.

Anonymous said...

Has anyone tried this as a cold pack for injuries that need to be iced?

Anonymous said...

I made a very wide collar of flannelette, sewed sections and filled them with wheat berries. Fits around my neck and over my shoulders. I can put it in the microwave for 1 minute ONLY for a heat pack. Or keep it in the freezer for a cold pack.

Anonymous said...

I read an internet article recently that had to do with fibers and heat. It said if you're making something that will be used near high heat or an open flame, that you should optimally use wool; because wool will burn, but when removed from source of heat/flame, it will put itself out. If wool is not available, the next best material is 100% cotton; because it will burn, but can be dowsed with water to stop burns or flames. The most IMPORTANT part of this article stated that you should NOT use acrylic or ANY synthetic (man-made) material for items that will be used near heat or an open flame; it WILL MELT and become a danger to anything it is near. Most *synthetic* yarn fibers (like acrylic) are made of plastic; and plastic melts.

I hope this helps someone! :)

Becky Reynolds said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
ACrochetFan said...

Hi Vicki! Thank you for sharing your pattern! I do have a few questions in regards to the pattern.

In the border, what does "ch1, sc in same sp" mean?

I also counted 16 on row 1 and subsequent rows. Do you count the ch2 as your first stitch?

One last question; what is the finished size of this rice pack cover?

Thank you I appreciate your help!

Creative Creations by Vicki said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Creative Creations by Vicki said...

ch 1, sc in same space simply means you crochet in the immediate first space you can crochet in. It is actually the implied stitch you are supposed to crochet in when you are working sc, but for newbies I wrote that in.
This was I think my first pattern ever written, so I just went ahead and adjusted the wording. The ch2 at the beginning of each row counts as the first stitch, so there should be therefore 17 hdc's at the end of each round actually. Sorry about any confusion.
Lastly, the finished pack is only about 4" or so wide. Just a small, cute, functional little pack.
Size adjustments can be made by making chains in increments of 16 stitches and adding 3 more stitches to the final count. Crochet then till the fabric is exactly twice the size as you wish it to be, and continue on with stitching it together and adding the boarder.

Bridget said...

This is cool. Iv been making tons of potholders while I sit w the elderly in thier homes; was excited 2find this cute, useable pattern.

Anonymous said...

Could you use like little gravel the kind that is used in fish tanks? Because rocks hold heat very well.

Anonymous said...

I have been making rice bags for years! I take a thick hand towel, cut it in half and then sew 2 sides closed. Fill with the rice, and sew the final side closed. I have a rice bag I made 12 yrs ago and it is still working fine.

http://etsyshop.com/Pubahsplace said...

Hi, 1st thanks for the free pattern, from an Etzyer too! I was a Yoga Instructor for 24 years and when I opened my studio, couldn't afford the eyebags. Well being my craftsy self I took used clothing, and stuffed them with, flax seed and chamomile with some dried lavender flowers. They were great for relaxation (Savasana) pose in my class and I was proud of myself! Then one of my students told me she kept hers in the freezer and put them on her eyes when she had a headache, because a lot of her headaches came from eyestrain. Then another student told me she used em for puffy eyes. Then low and behold a Drs wife came in a told me she was using her for a eyebag for neck pain. I KNOW flax seed can be heated and wont burn through, but I do think Ill leave out the lavender oil, and chamomile flowers. I'm not yet sure what Ill use for a liner, but once i get in my craftroom/recycle room, im sure something will just pop out at me.

Rena Duran said...

Thanks for the great idea but I was wondering what would work best for neck pain an migrains ? Flax seed, rice or the corn stuff?

Elayne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Elayne said...

aI make these also, I use a mans white cotton tube sock. They come in a bag of four at Walmart and are cheap. I double knot the end after filling with regular rice. Not Minute Rice. I microwave them for exactly one minute 25 seconds.
I heard some people use beans. I would like to know what kind . That sounds better than rice.

Karen Roth said...

My Mother -in-law made heat packs out of just plain navy white beans. They do not hold the heat as long as the rice does. In fact, if you have Chronic Illnesses or Arthritis I recommend the rice. I suffer from Ankylosing Spondylitis and Fibromyalgia.

I have one big rice pack I made that I heat in my 600 watt microwave for exactly 3 min 10 secs. For the smaller bean packs I use I only put them in for 1 min 45 sec. I am loving my rice though!

Now I use the bean bags my mother-in-law made in the freezer for my Migraines. Put it in a ziplock and you can use it for hemorrhoids. Just Saying :o)

Thanks for the pattern, cannot wait to make some.

Donna aka Betty said...

To answer the question about "What Kind of Beans" I make sewn heat/cold bags and use Kidney Beans. I make a lining bag out of white cotton, fill and stitch closed. Then I sew an outer decorative sham with the opening fold in the center back. That way you can wash the outer cover. I am still using the same bag I made over 15 yrs ago and it works great. Nice thing about using beans is that they hold up to both heat and cold.
I love this crochet idea and will try it! Thanks so much for the pattern.

AngélicaCV said...

Lol! I was thinking in this while I was reading the previous comments! Isn't that odd!
By the way, this idea is much prettier than the one I sewed some time ago!!!

Just Jen said...

Cotton inside and out is the only way to go. No worries about melting or catching fire. These can be stored in freezer for ice packs or microwave for hot pack. :)

Angelyn said...

I immediately got out the cotton yarn and the ole size G and started. I chained 18 and started the first hdc in the 3rd hole and then in each of the remaining chains, but I didn't have 17 when I was done. I had 15. I did it over, twice even, and the same thing happened. I'm not very bright but I'm a happy child. What am I doing wrong??

Oh, did anyone ever try the flax seed? And if yes, how did it work?

Carolyn E. said...

Another place to get corn is a feed and seed store.

pamela talbott said...

Just reading your post have u tryed cherry pits u can it by the pound its hold heat and lg enough to stay in bags

MaddyP said...

I use flax seed with lavender and it's the most wonderfully relaxing thing you can imagine.

As for the "melting"issue, anything you plan on heating should be a natural material such as cotton, which is what I use. Acrylics will melt if they get too hot.

Barbara Bouchard said...

Vicki,

I seem to have misplaced my pattern. Where can I get another copy.

Thank you

Barbara

Anonymous said...

Hi all,
I was wondering, what are the dimensions of the finished pack?
Thank you!

CharleneJ said...

I made one of these and used cotton yarn and a scrap of white cotton I had from another project instead of the nylon, and I love it. I use it with a damp rag to clean my dog's eyes as it keeps the rag warmer longer. But does anyone know if are these washable?

Anonymous said...

I am new to these crochet/knit sites and I have been reading a lot of these comments which are great. Reading Barbara's comment about cooking the rice and burning the cover - I use a wheat hot pack myself (going to try the rice though), and I ALWAYS place a cup of hot water in the microwave with the pack for 1 1/2 minutes. This stops the rice/wheat from drying out and therefore the outer bag does not burn.

marywich said...

Walmart and other feed stores are carrying Deer Corn now -- for hunters to attract deer to their ambush. That should work.
I don't know the price.

Jo Jo said...

Was wondering...how long does it retain the heat for?

auntie ellen said...

Hi, I get my feed corn at Agway or the grain store. Tell them you want FEED corn. Rice works well for the kids, hot enough and light enough not to make it hurt them more. I also Always put the bags in a zip lock, for hot or cold. Fleece DOES NOT work, it retains moisture and can burn or melt. I like the sock idea My daughter has a lot of missing socks. LOL Sew the sock end and insert into the little bag, then you can wash the outer cover. Hope this helps. We have used these so much I need to make more. Thanks for this pattern!

Tami Haney said...

I have been making corn bags for years using denim. I am now going to start using this pattern so a huge thank you!!. I buy my corn "feed corn" at the feed store. #50 for $15. Make sure you put it in a plastic tub, mice like it a lot, wether it is in the house or garage :)

Anonymous said...

On essential oil - please consider buying a good brand of pure essential oil. What's in Michael's candle section is usually pretty toxic ... A pure oil will cost more, but I promise you'll know the difference (especially heated up...)

turtlelady said...

Hi. Just a note. Don't use acrylic yarn. I have read it can catch fire 🔥quickly in a microwave.
Just saying.. ..⚠

Anonymous said...

I dont like the smell of the rice. It eventually goes really hard [after a couple of winters]. I think the brown rice sounds masterful as it would take longer to 'cook'. The linseed does not smell, but I think it loses its heat too fast.

Jilspan said...

That sounds delightful. Flax seeds might even add some healthy benefit to the warmth. Probably not, but it will make me think of it as healthy. Hahaha. I an going to try this tho. I LOVE thiis oattern and the idea. I suffer from chronic pain. This could be handy. I might even make one long enough to be a cover for my vinyl ice packs

dris ris said...

I use these heat packs to warm my dog's bed in the winter. He gets excited when he sees me placing it in the microwave. He likes to curl up next the the warmth

Mary Wichmanowski Karnstedt said...

I've saved this since the first time you posted it earlier this year. I even bought the rice. But it's taken until now to finally try it.
I filled my husband's sock with the rice, microwaved it for 2 minutes, and VOILA! it works! Some day I just may make a crochet sleeve to cover it. lol I'll have to buy the cotton yarn first.
But THANKS! all my "bed buddies" as they were called years ago have long since died and I haven't seen any anywhere. These are THE BEST for aches and pains.
You can't go to sleep with a heating pad turned on, but you CAN get relief and fall asleep with one of these!

Anonymous said...

I only use pure essential oils NOT FRAGRANT OILS. A great source is planttherapy.com or edensgarden.com. Hope this helps you!

Unknown said...

Definitely use a PURE ESSENTIAL OIL. NOT fragrance oil!

janet haworth said...

'Scents' are not essential oils, and may be mostly 'fillers', minimal e.o. Not something we want in our homes, or near our bodies! There is no regulation on this industry, so anything can be used as a filler.

janet haworth said...

'Scents' are not essential oils, and may be mostly 'fillers', minimal e.o. Not something we want in our homes, or near our bodies! There is no regulation on this industry, so anything can be used as a filler.

isuz said...

I use microwaved shelled corn bags made with white men's work socks (either knotted or tied with string) placed near the bowl to keep my bread dough warm while it is rising in the oven. I'm going to crochet some of these. They will look more at home with food.

Malinda Williamson said...

I did not see the approximate size but I was thinking about a travel pillowcase. After filling with desired amount of rice you could hand stitch the end closed. If this size pillowcase is too large you could cut it in half and either hand sew or machine stitch open ends. Just a suggestion.

Jeannine Leavitt said...

Its safe to put in Microwave?
Wont catch fire?

Jeannine Leavitt said...

I wouldnt use nylon.
Jmo.
Be safe.

Jeannine Leavitt said...

I wouldnt use nylon.
Jmo.
Be safe.

HAZEL said...

MY DAUGHTER-IN-LAW IN NZ HAS SCOLDED ME FOR NOT PUTTING HALF A MUG OF WATER IN THE MICROWAVE WITH A HEAT BAG TO PREVENT IT CATCHING FIRE. THIS I ALWAYS DO NOW. IT DOES CAUSE THE BAG TO FEEL A LITTLE DAMP BUT THAT IS NOT REALLY A PROBLEM.

Anonymous said...

Check with your local Pharmacist, frequently they can order essential oils and you won't have to pay shipping/handling costs.

barb hale said...

Has anyone thought to use 100% cotton t-shirts as the bag holder instead of nylons? This should work and not melt.

Unknown said...

I agree with the cotton option. Please try using rock salt or rice husk as an alternate filling. The salt filling is for people who have edema in their feet. It helps reduce the inflammation and is part of ayurvedic treatment.

Caution: touch to feel the heat. Salt retains heat when microwaved because it has a higher percentage of moisture. However, it retains heat longer.

Anonymous said...

If you do not mind I will use your idea for a neck/shoulder pack. My father-in-law suffers from MS. Living in Arizona cooling off is quite a challenge for him. Thank you so much for sharing this. God bless you.

Rebecca Willoughby said...

Hi! I make these often and I don't use a nylon stocking. I use a piece of thin muslin. If you don't see that is easy,just cut it into a rectangle that will fit folded over in your crochet bag and fill the center third. Fold one third over, then the other third and tie both ends tightly with a piece of your cotton yarn. No worries about melting!

Rebecca Willoughby said...

I meant SEW not see, spell check changed it on me, sorry for that

Sandy said...

To avoid the possible problem with nylon and to make the who thing washable, I fill cotton tube socks with the rice and leave one end of the crocheted cover open. Mist the sock before microwaving and insert it into the crocheted sleeve. The sock can be replaced when it wears out and the crocheted cover can be washed.

Anonymous said...

I am going to make this, but after reading ALL the comments, I have decided to crochet a little flap on the open end before stuffing with the rice or flax packet. Then the little flap can be folded over the packet and folded back if the outside gets dirty, and it can be washed and then the packet reinserted when it is dry. I hope what I've written makes some kind of sense. It's perfectly clear in my head!! lol

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the pattern for mini packs which I look forward to making. It is listed on Allfree Crochet patterns today. The bigger (sewn material)) packs that I have use 100% cotton material throughout and are either filled with corn feed or flax. My pain clinic uses flax because they find it keeps the heat the longest. Before heating mine, I spray each side and the ends with a fine spray of water to help avoid possible fire. This also gives a steam heat, depending on how much you spray it, which penetrates better for deep muscle pain. Always heat packs from room temperature. Never take packs directly from freezer/refrigerator to microwave. How long you heat them for depends on wattage of microwave but heating incrementally and turning over part way through is the satest method. Hint: make packs in shades of two different colours which will help you identify easily which ones are for the freezer and which ones are for heating. Hapoy Relaxing!

Airica Asuquo said...

My mother use to make these by sewing them. She made them with both corn and Rice. We use to use them as both hot packs and ice packs. As an ice pack they usually last about 15 min. We usually stored them in the freezer when not in use. I am looking forward to trying this since I don'the have a sewing machine.

Oliver Donna said...

I just made 3 of these and I love them! I'm going to give them as gifts! I used flaxseed that I bought for a fairly good price on amazon. I put all the flaxseed in a container and then added scented oils and let it sit for the day after mixing. Just a few drops of 2 different scents is plenty. I then used Muslim bags that I stuffed with the flaxseed and pulled the strings tightly(these came as bags with strings to tighten-much easier). I then placed them in the cotton crocheted strip and crocheted shut.. They hold up beautifully in the microwave and the scent is so nice. This may cost more than rice and knee highs but no problems and should last quite long. Flaxseed works so much better in the microwave and there's no smell at all unless you use oils, however, oils aren't really needed if you don't want to use them.
Thank you so much for this terrific idea- never heard of these before and I love crocheting- I hate sewing:)! I have actually bought several bags that can be heated or cooled for myself, my son and several friends- very expensive. These are so much nicer and hand made makes it even nicer!

Dorothy Larson said...

Or from a local farmer or elevator BUT the concern of bugs is very real!

Dorothy Larson said...

Nice to know! Thanks

Andre Bergeron said...

Thank you so much for this rice bag pattern. I have made,
one for me... love it and use it a lot!
worked up real quick, instructions easy to follow.
Will make more for quick gifts for Christmas.
Thank you!
Barbi Bergeron